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Uni Casual

Posts tagged with casuals

  1. Things I wish I'd known about alt-ac: The Research Whisperer

    Posted 23 July 2014 by Paul Clifton (Uni Casual)

    When I was first approached to write this article for Connect, I felt compelled to present a stats-ridden view of why thinking about alternative academic (alt-ac) pathways was not only possible, but necessary. 

    What I’ve ended up writing, though, is what I wish I’d been told about alt-ac career paths when I was at various job decision points in my life. 

    While stats can be good to give an overview of the sector, they don’t help when it comes to making highly personal and contextualised decisions about what you choose to do. 

    I have been to and fro several times between being an academic and professional administrative staff. Some of those jobs were by choice, and some were forced by circumstance.  A continuing academic position is often thought of as the traditional ‘destination’ for a PhD student. It varies from discipline to discipline, with some – like those in engineering - particularly bemused by many disciplines’ dependency on the academy for a

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  2. The Budget and You: A brief guide for casuals

    Posted 23 July 2014 by Courtney Sloane (Uni Casual)

    Despite the Coalition’s promises to the contrary prior to the 2013 Federal Election, the 2014-15 Federal Budget presented some of the most dramatic changes to higher education in over a generation. It also laid a blue print for a fundamentally different approach to social investment and welfare. Public spending in many traditional areas has been slashed and community organisations, charities, families and individuals are scrambling to fill the void. While these changes will affect most people in some way or other, casual workers at Australian universities will face particularly challenging circumstances.

    For casuals who are combining work with study at the undergraduate level, the announcements will see government funding for courses cut by 20 per cent, the deregulation of university fees and for the first time, the charging of market interest rates on outstanding

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  3. RTS: Fees for degrees

    Posted 22 July 2014 by Jen T. Kwok (Uni Casual)

    Considerable pre-Budget speculation neither predicted the cuts to the Research Training Scheme (RTS), nor the introduction of up to $3900 in fees for research training. So what do these changes mean for Australian higher education? And what do they mean for you?

    What was announced in the Budget?

    The Abbott Government declared universities will be able to charge Higher Degree Research (HDR)  students an annual fee of up to $3900 (for a high cost degree), and $1,700 (for a low cost degree). The quantum of funding dedicated to the Research Training Scheme (RTS) is being reduced by 10 per cent (or about $174 million) because universities will have the ability to collect revenue through student contributions. Though unlikely, universities have the discretion not to charge fees.

    When will this reform start?

    Both measures come into effect on 1 January 2016.

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  4. Reaching out to contingent faculty in the US

    Posted 22 July 2014 by Paul Clifton (Uni Casual)

    I was very fortunate to be invited to attend and to present my research on academic casualisation in Australia at the 41st Annual Conference on Collective Bargaining in Higher Education, hosted by the National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education and the Professions (NCSCBHEP) at City University New York in April.

    The NCSCBHEP is a joint labour and management centre focussed on the study and promotion of collective bargaining as a means for advancing the working conditions of staff in higher education in the US.  The enormous diversity of higher education means that particularly for union representatives the opportunity to exchange ideas about developments in collective arrangements is extremely

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  5. Why I'm A Member: Karin Stokes

    Posted 18 July 2014 by Paul Clifton (Uni Casual)

    It’s something I’ve always done’ isn’t really a sufficient answer from a sociologist, so I’ll reflect and attempt to uncover the reasons for my engagement with unionism ...

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    Journal
    (6 MB) - PDF

    Connect, July 2014

    NTEU & CAPA magazine for casual and sessional academic staff. Vol. 7, no. 2
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  6. University work becoming more precarious

    Posted 18 July 2014 by Jeannie Rea (Uni Casual)

    The Commonwealth Department of Education recently released the university workforce data for 2012. This data, collected from the universities, reveals that since 2005 only one in four (24%) new jobs at Australian universities has been an ongoing or continuing job.  

    Three out of four have been contract or casual. Consequently, only one in two staff (on a full time equivalent (FTE) basis) employed at Australian universities now have secure employment (see Fig. 1). This means that the proportion of insecure workers in universities is much higher than the national

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  7. 2014 Online Teaching Conditions Survey

    Posted 7 July 2014 by Jen T. Kwok (NTEU National Office)

    The NTEU is seeking your input to help our campaign for better working conditions.

    If you are a casual or sessional academic, you can take the 2014 Online Teaching Conditions Survey here.

    You ...

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  8. NTEU Seminar with Robyn May in Melbourne 3 July 'Casualisation - global and Australian trends'

    Posted 27 June 2014 by Jen T. Kwok (NTEU National Office)

    The NTEU would like to invite Victorian members to an NTEU Seminar about academic casualisation on Thursday 3 July 2014.

    This is a unique opportunity to hear Robyn May talk with NTEU President ...

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  9. CASA: the house that casualisation built

    Posted 26 June 2014 by Paul Clifton (Uni Casual)

    US adjunct staff organising inspires Australian academic casual activists

    Early in 2014, Kate Bowles and Karina Luzia formed CASA (Casual, Adjunct, Sessional staff and Allies in Australian Higher Education). They share here with Advocate how and why they’re building CASA.

    We’re hearing quite a bit at the moment about US higher education as a model for deregulation in Australia. We look at their leafy college towns and ivy-covered campuses, their deep philanthropic pockets, their Silicon Valley entrepreneurialism, their MOOCs and, above all, their higher education rankings, and ask: why can’t we have what they’re having?  There are a couple of reasons why Australia should think twice about following America’s lead. One is the $1.3 trillion owed by Americans in student loans, second only to home mortgages. The other is the state of the academic

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  10. Uni work becoming more precarious

    Posted 23 June 2014 by Jeannie Rea (Uni Casual)

    NTEU’s National Conference on Insecure Work is scheduled to be held in Hobart in November 2014. There will be opportunities to connect remotely to the conference sessions. The focus is upon academic casuals, research contractors and soft money contracts, and needlessly casualised positions. 

    Since 2005, only one in four (24%) new jobs at Australian universities has been an ongoing or continuing job.  Three out of four have been contract or casual. Consequently, now only one in two staff (on a full time equivalent (FTE) basis) employed at Australian universities have secure employment (see Fig. 1)

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